EAA/AOPA Medical Petition Crucial to Future Flying

A classic Skyhawk, perfect for "recreational" flying

I think the joint EAA/AOPA petition that would allow pilots flying to a recreational standard to use a driver’s license instead of a third class medical is the single most important change that would reduce cost and hassle for many thousands of pilots. If the FAA approves the requested exemption untold numbers of pilots will keep flying, and many, many more will learn to fly.

The petition represents the very core of EAA philosophy which is to promote aviation safety through education, not regulation. In this case, the education is online aeromedical training that would teach pilots what health issues matter to flying safety, and how to identify those conditions. Once pilots understand which medical conditions can impact flying safety they can seek treatment and not fly until they know they are as safe as possible. Learning how health issues, medications, and even temporary conditions like fatigue or distractions over personal matters, can impact safety will work to enhance safety every day on every flight. The current third class medical system works only one day every two years for most pilots, or one day every five years for younger pilots, on the day they visit the AME.

AMEs don’t have the time to train pilots about aeromedical concerns. AMEs are only there to enforce rudimentary medical standards at a single point in time. For the other 729 days between third class exams, we pilots make our own decisions on our fitness to fly. And we make those decisions without any required training.

If the EAA/AOPA petition is approved pilots will be required to study an online course making them aware of the common medical conditions that can impact safety. And they will need to pass an exam to demonstrate they learned and understand the course material. Education, not regulation.

The petition is asking for the driver’s license medical exemption only for the existing recreational flying standard. The recreational standard is flying fixed gear single engine airplanes with 180 hp or less and carrying only a single passenger in day VFR conditions. You can fly cross country, in regulated airspace, or any other type of day VFR flying your certificate and training allow. EAA and AOPA selected this standard as a starting point because this definition of recreational flying already exists in the rulebook.

And a huge number of airplanes are eligible for recreational flying. Just think, Cessna has built more than 35,000 172 Skyhawks that would qualify. And more than 30,000 Cessna 150/152 were built. And then there are the many thousands more of Cherokees, Musketeer series, and thousands upon thousands of vintage airplanes that meet the requirements. My guess is well over half of all piston singles in the country are fixed gear with 180 hp or less.

I know that many pilots are wishing that the petition included higher horsepower, or retractable gear, or flying IFR, or carrying more passengers and so on. But we and the FAA have to start somewhere to make the switch from regulation to education. If, as we all hope, the exemption is granted, we will immediately begin to build a huge data base to confirm that education works. With that data the FAA will have a basis to eventually expand the types of flying we can do with education and a driver’s license in place of a third class medical.

So far more than 2,600 pilots have commented in support of the petition, but we need more. Logging more than 3,000 comments by the time the period closes on July 2 is a noteworthy and achievable goal. Please go to www.regulations.gov and search for Docket FAA-2012-0350 where you can make your comments.

If there’s one thing we can all agree on it’s that education and training are the way to improved flight safety, and that’s what the EAA/AOPA request is all about—making better trained pilots.

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75 Responses to EAA/AOPA Medical Petition Crucial to Future Flying

  1. I think you’re dreaming, at least with the current FAA / D.C. leadership. Plus, how does one compensate the LSA industry that will suffer unfair competition as a result? Let’s also be honest with ourselves – there are plenty of pilots out there now who should probably think about retiring for health reasons, I know of quite a few in our local EAA chapters. Everyone also knows which AMEs are easier than others to get past. If we’re looking to grow sport aviation by allowing people with questionable health issues to fly, we’re in serious trouble. Why not focus more on ending Mickey Mouse rules that forbid flying for minor health problems and treatable conditions that a few decades ago would have grounded us. What is being done in other countries, for instance Germany where sport aviation is strong?

    • JoeZ says:

      I agree with you Kent. I want anybody to tell me that dropping the third class medical will make the skies safer. Isn’t that what medical’s and BFR’s are all about…..making flying safer??

    • Frank R. Sandoval says:

      Mr. Misegades:

      Your presumptuous comments in Mr. McClellan’s blogs, question the intellect of the EAA community. Furthermore, some of us are not impressed by your engineering credentials. When it comes to writing about aviation issues, my money is on Mac Mc. Additionally, and more importantly, your EAA chapter position and membership does not bestow upon you the privilege to use every derogatory thought you DREAM of, towards your writing peer and fellow EAA member, Mr. McClellan. Prehaps you can display your top commentator skills more effectively in the blogoshere by ranting about gasoline issues on your blog in General Aviation News and no one will be offended.

      Comments you and your cohorts direct at Mr. McClellan, or any agent of this organization with unwarranted hostility, is not merely an error in abstraction but one that is profoundly destructive. When you distort the meaning of Mr. McClellan’s articles, it reeks devestation in the eyes of the readers. My question is; what does it profit you to express yourself with such presumptuous hostility.

      Great article, Mr. McClellan. Keep up your excellant work.

  2. Dave Doherty says:

    I completely agree with you Mac. Of all the people I know, nobody has a death wish, and they take steps to prolong their existence on this earth. Opening up the many thousands of aircraft types to the Sport Pilot should be a boon to General Aviation. With the SP rules as they are, aircraft have to be made just about as light as possible, which reduces wing loading and sensitivity to the environment. This severely limits how often the aircraft may be used safely. More robust designs, with higher wing loadings can penetrate gusty conditions much better, and in my opinion, result in safer flying. I am a private pilot flying within the SP rules for my own reasons, and my choices for a reasonably priced used airplane have been very much limited. It would be nice to have a sturdy cross-country plane in my stable. I urge the flying community to make useful comments about the petition before the FAA. I’m going there now to do that.
    Thanks for your contributions to aviation and giving us food for thought.
    Dave Doherty
    EAA #119064

  3. John says:

    Well said Mac.

  4. Jeff Boatright says:

    The third class medical has never made any sense to me. There are no data that indicate it has any impact on safety. I don’t even see that there is a good hypothetical argument for its existence. On the other hand, there are plenty of data that indicate that educating a motivated group about healthy behavior, including self-monitoring outcomes, can be beneficial to individual health and group health indexes.

    Kent, I think that the exemption will do exactly what you are asking for – in one swell foop it will end several Mickey Mouse rules that have no impact on safety.

  5. Medical issues aside, I really have problems with the fact that an entire industry – LSA – has evolved with great effort and investment from manufacturers, based on a very clear set of rules and using the well-proven ASTM certification process. These companies needed to know that the government would not change rules in mid-stream, allowing tens of thousands of old, cheap spam cans to suddenly qualify. It’s just not right, and I would not be surprised to see the LSA companies do all they can to block this action. For those worried that LSA designs with lower wing loadings are unsuited for flight training and pleasure flying, I would respond with two words: Piper Cub.

    • Jeff Boatright says:

      Kent, an alternative perspective is that overall the LSA industry is a flawed business model. First, it relies on a niche market being artificially created by regulations. Admittedly, this happens all the time in other arenas, but the risk is obvious and fairness doesn’t really enter into it. Second, the LSA manufacturers misread their market. There is not much demand for a $130,000 LSA-compliant airplane and this is so for a variety of reasons. And this feeds back in to the first reason. If LSA manufacturers were meeting the needs of the market such that the goals individuals and of groups like EAA and AOPA members were being met, there would be much less enthusiasm for the medical exemption process. Groups and individuals will press for regulatory change that meets their needs and advances their agendas.

    • Thomas Boyle says:

      Kent,

      You’re suggesting that a some manufacturers will fight to retain regulations that strangle most of the industry and cut the number of pilots, in hopes that their (little) corner will benefit. They may, but the rest of us should oppose those efforts. I actually don’t think those manufacturers will take that position; my sense is that after some soul-searching they have realized that they need to support what’s good for the overall market, then fight for their share.

      LSA is not Sport Pilot. LSA was a testing ground for a new approach to aircraft certification, and it has worked amazingly well. The biggest problem the manufacturers have is not that there might be slightly fewer aging pilots forced to look at smaller airplanes; it’s that there are so many LSA producers.

      I think you’ll find that Flight Design and Tecnam are not limiting themselves to LSA. They’re right: it’s likely that the successful LSA manufacturers will use LSA as their entry point, migrating to larger designs over time, which in turn will require a pilot population to support them. This proposal helps that, by protecting the pilot population. What the LSA producers need now, is the extension of ASTM standards to larger aircraft – and the Part 23 review may produce an outcome like that.

      LSA probably should never have been marketed as being for “old people/no medical.” In fact, I think that association has hurt the industry badly, as pilots who DO have medicals mentally wrote off LSA as “not for me.” (The success of the cub-alikes suggests that, indeed, the industry has been pitching to old-timers – even most middle-aged pilots have never flown a Cub.) But, the LSA industry also produces an incredible range of stylish, modern, fun designs – “not your grandfather’s airplane”. It’s like the Swatch of aviation. It should have marketed itself that way from the beginning, and now it’s time.

    • Thom Riddle says:

      Kent,
      I think you’ve missed the point entirely. The purpose of Sport Pilot was not to allow old pilots to skirt medical issues, and as others have said, it is a separate issue to the new LSA category of aircraft certification.

      I earned my private pilot certificate in 1966 but for the last 7+ years I’ve been flying airplanes which Sport Pilots can fly because they are fun to fly. I cannot afford a new SLSA nor would I spend that kind of money on one if I could when perfectly good and far less expensive experimental aircraft meeting the SP requirements are available. I’ve been happily flying experimental airplanes since we sold our Cherokee in 2004. I let my 3rd class medical lapse because it was not needed for my type of recreational flying. But now that this EAA/AOPA proposal has been made, and I believe has a good chance of being accepted, I recently renewed my third class medical so that I could purchase a share in a type certificated Diamond Katana, which does not meet the SP requirements. If the proposal passes, I will let my medical lapse again. If it does not, I will continue getting a new 3rd class medical every two years. Getting the medical or not has very little (if anything) to do with my medical fitness for flying since I am obligated by the FARs to self-assess before each flight. I am not suicidal and always plan each flight in such a way as to maximize the probability that I will live to fly another day. Self-preservation is a powerful force for making sure one is medically fit for each flight.

      My point is that the SLSA industry sells their new aircraft primarily to well heeled pilots. That is their market which is overcrowded with way too many manufacturers trying to compete for the rich (by my standards) minority. That intense competetion is their problem, one that entrepreneurs knowingly take on when they start a business. That problem is totally unrelated to this medical exemption proposal and of no concern to me nor the majority of not-rich pilots.

  6. Mac says:

    Hi Kent,
    The driver’s license medical option is just one element of the Sport Pilot and LSA rule. And it is an important factor. But the LSA rule exists so that people have the option to buy a brand new airplane for less money than one certified to FAR Part 23 standards. Many were unrealistic about how low the price of an LSA could be, but the cost is still substantially below main stream piston singles. FARs evolve constantly. For example, years ago a single-pilot jet was not allowed. Now there are several models. FAR Part 23 capped takeoff weight at 12,500 pounds for decades, but then the commuter category came along and several Part 23 airplanes now weigh much more than 12,500 pounds. LSA will succeed on their own merits, not just the requirement for third class medicals in other airplanes.
    Mac Mc

    • Jeff Boatright says:

      I don’t know that LSAs will succeed, regardless of intent. I agree with your points, though. There is a lot more to the Sport Pilot and resultant Light Sport Aircraft than the medical requirement.

      All this aside, I am entirely in support of the medical exemption.

  7. Ramiro Silveira says:

    Dear USA friends,

    Don´t loos time, grab the chance you have to make flying in your country easier, simpler and cheaper.
    In Brazil, the regulatory agency did a bad copy and paste of the american LSA/SP rules so that it will be necessary a fresh created 4th class medical card to be a sport pilot, the driver´s license won´t be accepted.
    They are giving a huge step back overruling sport aviation, our equivalent to FAR 61 will require a dedicated license for aerobatics. In order to have it, it will be necessary 100 h of experience on the type of plane you intend to perform aerobatics, 20 h of training in a certified aerobatic school (there is none by now), besides a 1st class medical card.
    Stupidity does not have limits!!!
    Regards,

    Ramiro

  8. Rodney says:

    IF the medical petition fails another option might be to increase the weight standard for a LSA airplane to 2,000 pounds. This would allow a lot of sport pilots to fly cessna 152s, tomahawks, etc. which are abundantly available on the used market. This would increase the number of pilots. After flying a 152 for awhile they may decide they like it and either get a PPL or buy one of the more expensive LSA planes. I see very few pilots dropping over 100K on a plane just after they get their license, most buy an older used plane then work their way up or after flying awhile they build a plane. I think this would benefit both current pilots worried about flying their sport planes and the LSA industry as a whole. Increase the pilots taking less expensive LSA training, give then inexpensive used planes to fly, they then upgrade to newer LSA planes or get a PPL and buy a bigger plane and everyone wins. You can look at it like cars somewhat, very few people drive a 50,000 dollar car right after they get their license. Most of us started out with a used car that we could afford and as time went by upgraded to better and better models. If getting a drivers license cost 10,000 and the cheapest car was 40-50,000 how many people would just be riding the bus?

  9. I have posted comments in favor of this petition, but I agree with those who say that it’s a pipe dream. Thanks greatly to Rep. Oberstar, this proposal has the proverbial snowball’s chance of going through. Instead, the FAA is spending huge chunks of money double-checking medical applications for reasons to deny while few, if any, additional resources are targeted at speeding up SI reviews. The Aeromedical Division is broken and there’s nothing coming down the pike to fix it.

  10. Given the inflexibility of the current FAA, I am very skeptical this will pass. I completely understand that SP and LSA are two separate issues, but they are nevertheless closely-related. Also forgotten in this discussion are the arguments that led to the 1320 lb gross weight limitation for LSAs – it has to do with an inflection on statistical curves of injuries versus gross weight in airplane crashes, according to people I know who worked on the LSA criteria. I do not know how anyone can criticize LSA makers for the prices of their airplanes – they are simply delivering what the market demands. If they can not sell a $150,000 airplane, they won’t offer it. Besides, there are quite a few very nice LSA designs well under $100,000, which is probably about the same as a new C-150 in 1966 relative to average annual incomes, but the LSA has far more sophisticated systems and creature comforts. Van himself challenged anyone who thinks they can build an LSA for under $100,000 and make a profit to go out and try it for themselves. With the engine and avionics alone costing around $50,000 these days, I do not see how this is possible for a factory-built airplane. Just as Part 23 rules will dictate many aspects of an airplane’s design, so too ASTM LSA rules dictate how an LSA will be designed. This is not an artificial market, but the result of decades of engineering & flight experience and sound reasoning concerning safety and crashworthiness. As a result of the success of a number of these LSA manufacturers, we’re seeing the emergence of highly-advanced, Part 23 four-place aircraft and even twins from companies like Flight Design, Tecnam, Pipistrel, Diamond and others. Given the choice between a new C-182 designed 40/50/60 years ago and the new Tecnam P2010, Flight Design C4, or Pipistrel Panthera, well, there’s no comparison really. The fact that this entire medical effort emerged without the involvement of LAMA leaders looks like an effort from GAMA and some other alphabets to slow the growth of the LSA market, the only sector of GA that has seen real growth in the past 5 years. Many of the new pilots in the large (180+) chapter I run are younger people who have chosen the SP license, not for health reasons, but because it’s cheaper, fits their flying needs, and they prefer the high/new tech of the latest LSA planes. I understand that it sucks to lose your medical due to some trivial issue. Why don’t we focus on the medicals themselves instead of mucking with the certification and licenses? Issues that were life-threatening 40 years ago are non-issues today and the whole medical certificate rules should reflect this, somewhat like the military allowing laser surgery to correct eyesight, unthinkable when I applied in 1979. Nevertheless, just as we need to face the music and admit that the homebuilt aircraft accident rate is a real problem that can not be ignored, we also need to admit that when flying there is no room for a medical problem. You can not pull over to the side of the road and call 911. Pilots need to be in better physical condition than the average driver. I know many will disagree, including members of my own EAA chapter 1114, but I hope that folks will look at both sides of the argument and consider the potential damage this change might cause to an exciting new sector of aviation.

  11. Christopher Stone says:

    Mr. Misagades,
    Why are you even using the LSA argument as a crutch to bolster your disagreement with this proposal. As a pilot I assume you to be a logical person- stick to explaining the logic to being checked by a AME once in 48 months then getting in that aircraft potentially every day for 2 years without be declared “fit to fly” by an AME…completely illogical!!! ……Like mom used to say ” if you can’t speak nicely say nothing”…….I certainly think the LSA folks will live to fight another day regardless of whether this proposal passes or not…..by the way are you in the LSA industry??? Right on Mac!!!

  12. Jim Klick says:

    From a safety standpoint, who is safer: the 60 year old in excellent health that has been flying his 172 for 30 years or that same 60 year old learning a new airplane with a glass cockpit ?
    Tell that same 60 year old that he cannot fly his familiar 172 any more and ask him if he will sell it for $40K and spend $140K for what is essentially a 150 with a glass cockpit.
    GA in this country is supported by those in their maximum income years. Trying to attract the magic demographic 20 to 34 years olds is a fools errand.
    They don’t have any money.
    I have a Pitts S1S that I have owned since 1995 . When they tell me I cannot fly it anymore, I will buy my wife a Cadillac and spend a lot more time on the golf course.
    The money I spend on my memberships in EAA, AOPA, IAC and WOA will pay my
    greens fees.

    Jim Klick
    S1S N9JT
    EAA 106287
    IAC 6870
    AOPA 682160
    FAA Master Pilot Award

    • I got my PP ticket when I was 20 years old. I bought into my first airplane 23 years later. I had a 10 year gap in my flying as well. I’m not alone in those circumstances. If we can get people involved young they may not be able to maintain their flying during the diaper to diploma period, but they may very well come back to aviation. Real flying life starts when the dog dies and the kids leave home.

  13. John Olsen says:

    Jim,

    Your assertion that there’s no use in marketing aviation to those in the 20-34 demographic is an unfortunate overgeneralization, and throws a spear into the heart of the very folks we are looking at to carry the future of our industry. As a financial counselor, I can tell you that the younger generation is becoming smarter at handing their finances than their parents’ generation was. I don’t see too many broke 25 year-olds in my office, but bucketloads of bankrupt 50′s and 60′s. The younger generation has their entire financial future in front of them, and their savviness with technolgy is landing them plenty of high-paying jobs. So if it’s airplanes they love, why not get them flying?

    Our local flying club is breaking records this year, from the standpoints of hours flown and revenue received. A solid chunk of the flying is from those in the 20-34 demographic, and we are a cash-only operation. So please don’t tell me that young folks don’t have money, because obviously some do.

    • Christopher Stone says:

      John,
      I don’t think Jim is tryingto throw a spear into the heart of our future aviatiors, he is making a valid point, the highest percentage of personal wealth in this country is not in the age range of 20-34 year old people…..but even that strays from the real point here….It’s not about the money! It’s not about the seniority of our pilot group…It’s about the education of our pilot group……educating our most senior pilots when it’s time to say when, educating every pilot to be a better aeromedical decision maker, and trying to make a currently flawed aeromedical process more logical and user friendly. Everyone is focusing on LSA and the money….lets focus on what’s right…that AME cannot check you before every flight…therefore YOU are the AME before each of YOUR flights…Why are we depending on them for that 1 day in 2 years, when perhaps day 1 AFTER your flight check you could very well be developing an medical issue that carries on for the next 730 days…the onus is on US to self certify. I personally think this proposal only has an upside because it put’s 1 more aeromedical decision making tool in the pilots toolbox. Let’s just leave the money game and the LSA out of this and champion this proposal and hope that for once government could embrace the logical and potentially overturn a illogical decision.

  14. Jim Klick says:

    John Olsen;
    Your comment about flying clubs reinforces my point. Ten people can easily
    Afford a $140K airplane. One person cannot.
    I also understand that airplanes are more expensive for many reasons.
    One of them is putting $75K instrument panels in a $60K airplane.
    To me, a glass cockpit (and electric trim) in a Cub reproduction is ludicrous.

  15. Tom Wadsworth says:

    A smart pilot will STILL go see doctors when they feel the need. I believe the FAA will do the right thing and move ahead with this proposal. There were many stepping stones to get to this point. Ragollo hang gliders, Powered Hang Gliders, 103 Ultralights, Ultralights for instruction only, Light Sport pilots and now Recreational pilots. It is the logical progression to show the FAA that even taking baby steps will still get you toward doing the right thing.

  16. roger B says says:

    Mac, Tom and Jim make some powerful points in favor of the proposed driver’s license, areomedical education and upgrade to 180hp fixed gear proposal. I too began flying in 1966, and take my two year medical exam as you all have done. And just as I check the weather and flight plan, I also review how I am feeling. If I have had a stressful day at the office, am overly frustrated with my neighbors owl, or just don’t feel good…I self certify that flying is not for me. As for costs, when I began, that used 150 was about 3500, and I was earning 3500 a year as a 1st lt in the air force… So present earning about 40K would put me in the cockpit for about 40K…. which is doable,even for some older cherokees and 172s.. Not the 140K I see for the new LSA aircraft. So cost is a factor, but the chief reason I have written supporting the new proposal is that it will
    permit many pilots to train in well proven aircraft, with experienced flight instructors of these flying machines. Safety is my watchword, and has been noted. I would like to have a 4 place allocation, and with the passage of this proposal, we could begin to demonstrate that future reality… then on to the complex wheels up and even higher horsepower equipment… Come On, flying that 182 might be the next step, and that a/c has a stellar record of safety. Lets get behind this proposal and support this very reasonable modification to the present ruling.

  17. Joe says:

    Instead of seeing this as a fly in the butter of LSA’s, I see this as an opportunity, especially for E-AB. With 180-horse, vari/CS prop, and no weight restrictions, I could see Rans, Zenith, et al expanding their product lines. Super Cub, anyone? Yeah, it’s expensive, but go buy a new 1/2-ton pickup with all the bells and whistles. At least the plane will be worth more than twenty-percent of the initial purchase price in five years.

  18. Thomas Boyle says:

    I have some sympathy with folks who feel that if the FAA process should be fixed, instead of worked around through a process like this.

    “If only”, the thought goes, “the FAA weren’t so willing to flag a medical application for review based on the most vague issues (most of them not even listed among the handful of explicit reasons for a denial), so incredibly slow to do the review, so arrogantly dismissive of specialists who know more than they do, and so hypercautious when they actually get around to the review, then it might be possible to fix the Third Class Medical instead of generating a workaround like this proposal”.

    Unfortunately, decades of history suggest that we’ll all be dead of old age long before that happens. An FAA bureaucrat has much to lose and little to gain from approving a medical application that has any question mark on it – even an invalid one. On the other hand, there is little to lose by denying it, and a denial immediately frees up resources for other things. The fact is, it is only because the FAA bureaucrats in question are actually aviation enthusiasts themselves, that we get any meaningful reviews at all. The bureaucratic incentive, at every step, is to find a reason to say “no”.

    Given the disincentives the unfortunate FAA people face, the best way to fix this is not to hope the FAA will improve; they’re already out on a limb to do as much as they do. The best way to fix it is to let them off the hook altogether, and put the responsibility back where it belongs.

  19. Finbar Sheehy says:

    It strikes me as disappointing that, of the leadership of the two associations, I can find only Rod Hightower (President/CEO of EAA) among the published commenters.

    Where’s the leadership of AOPA (Craig Fuller, Robert Moran, Douglas Kitani, Bruce Landsberg)? Where’s the Board of AOPA (Lawrence “Larry” Buhl, Darrell Crate, Matt Desch, Burgess Hamlet, Paul Heintz – although Sebastian Heintz commented, Herman Neel Hipp, R. Anderson Pew, William “Bill” Trimble, and James Tuthill Jr.)?

    Perhaps it’s just that their comments haven’t been published yet…

  20. Mike M says:

    I do not concur with the AOPA or EAA position on the FAA Class III medical.

    To say that the cost of an FAA Class III medical is causing a detrimental burden on aviation is ludicrous. $100 or so for a Class III medical every 2 years for those over 40, and every 5 years for those under 40, is not a burden. It’s cheap insurance and the smart and responsible thing to do.

    With that said, however, I believe we need a better Class III, one that is more complete and thorough and maybe more like what is currently required for the Class II medical. And we need AMEs to provide more consistent FAA medical exams. Who oversees the AMEs to see what they are really doing? Letting those who fly aircraft, of any type, off the hook for a periodic medical exam, for whatever reason, is a disservice to the aviation community and shows a lack of responsibility.

    There are issues of more significant impact to GA such as (1) the price of aviation fuel, (2) shoddy flight instruction that actually dissuades student pilots from completing their flight training program, and (3) slovenly, poorly managed, and expensive rental operations that disappoint and frustrate non-owner GA pilots from continuing their involvement with flying.

    • Frank R. Sandoval says:

      Reading your comment reminds me of a small boat in a big storm. I can’t help but reflect on the struggles in history between truth and falsehood, and the consequences of error. I am reminded that those who attempt to divide seek their own gain.

      The first step back from the F. A. A. abyss and towards order is to build consistency into the F.A.R.’s and to generate an economic senario that will stop the present environment that is destroying General Aviation. The medical petiton by E.A.A. and A.O.P.A. should be viewed as an effort to build more consistency, safety, and more sound regulations that will shed a light on the incongruous F.A.A. mindset.

  21. Anonymous says:

    I really hope that the AOPA EAA medical exemption is passed! I have been flying a Cessna 152 for a short while now, because the Cessna 162 isn’t available for quite awhile now and I really like the 152! And it is hard to find an LSA and a sport pilot program in my state. Either pass the medical exemption or make the 150 and 152 LSA, or both!

  22. Gary says:

    Let’s hope that the Sport Pilot “Catch-22″ (can’t fly with a denied medical on record)
    does not also end the dreams of many pilots from flying on the medical exemption!
    Anyone know if such a clause was already included when it was written? I hope not.
    I currently fly a rented motorglider half-way across the country whereas at a local airport to me are many C-150/152/172 aircraft for rent. Let’s make this happen…

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